Technology

Niall Mulrine

Technology: Are we hooked on our mobile phones?

Phone hooked

A CONDITION called nomophobia is described as the fear of being without mobile contact. This has happened so fast that it’s not in medical text books yet, but it’s known and discussed between medical professions.

In Spain, two young teenagers were admitted to a mental health facility to get treated for their over reliance on their mobile phone. When quizzed how often they used it, the answer startled doctors, that they spend a staggering 6 hours a day using the phone. Trastic for teenagers to be so engrossed in phones, but the question is; Do our children get phones and devices earlier as each year goes by?

Nomophonia is a reality
Some may think what kind of strange oddity has occurred out there, that people are getting worried when their phone is not with them. 66 % people in the UK are affected with this condition and 75% people in India. These numbers are alarming that such emotions are placed on a motionless product.

Advertisement

But, to most people, these devices are what are keeping relationships with friends and family alive. How? Well, some people that may never have picked up a phone to call or make a physical visit to a relative or friend would actually stay in contact much easier via text messages or social media. It is less intrusive and it’s more casual.

Are there too many devices available?

The uses of the mobile phones are far beyond what they were 5 years ago even. Texts and phone calls were the main instruments available within the handset. Now, phones come packed with so much power and resources, that they are practically mini laptops.

Apps, email clients, online banking, internet and many more gadgets are necessary to make an attractive Smartphone in the 21st century. This is evident from the high sales of iPhones, BlackBerry’s and Android handsets. A survey also found that 41% people had another phone as a backup to their main handset in case they were left without.

33% of children take phones to bed
A Melbourne psychologist claimed that people get panic attacks when they realise they do not have their phone in their possession. People have claimed that they would rather be without their wallet or toothbrush than not have their phone.

In the UK, recently found that school children are getting less sleep due their addiction to the phone. 33% have admitted that when they go to bed, they take the phone with them and find it hard to leave it down. When they do leave it down, they place it beside them like a teddy bear on their pillow so if a text or alert comes in, they can react to it as quick as possible.

Think how often you may use your own phone and take a look around at others how they behave with their phones, to check this new trend.

Contact Niall Mulrine
If you would like a workshop for a parents association, workplace conference, sports centre talk and many other venues, please contact me on 086-2377033

For more information & tips on Cyber Bullying & Internet Safety log on to www.CyberSafetyAdvice.com or contact Niall Mulrine 086-2377033 if you wish to hear how you can haven Internet Safety workshop in your area.

Advertisement

YES, the school holidays are coming, the weather is getting brighter and the days of getting up early for...

TIGHTLY clung inside my sweaty palm is the feeling of loneliness from a universe I have found myself immersed...

WE ALL know these people in our lives which are either somewhat related to us or a friend who...